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What potential uses could genetically modified soil bacteria have for the Department of Defense?

Discussion Leader: 
HDIAC Staff
Posted Date: 08/29/2016

Scientists sponsored by the Office of Naval Research have genetically modified a common soil bacteria to create electrical wires that can conduct electricity and are thousands of times thinner than a human hair. What potential uses could genetically modified soil bacteria have for the Department of Defense? 

Scientists sponsored by the Office of Naval Research have genetically engineered a new strain of bacteria, found naturally in dirt, to create electrical wires that not only conduct electricity, but also rival the thinnest wires known to humanity. The nanowires could have a great impact on the future force, contributing to everything from smaller electronic devices to alternative fuels. (Image courtesy of Dr. Derek Lovley)

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